/page/2
the-exercist:

5 Ways to Use Breathing Techniques to get a Better Workout:

"Don’t hold your breath!" It’s something we’ve all heard before while working out…and for good reason. "When you hold you breath, the energy in your cells plunges and you feel fatigued during your workout way before you should," says Belisa Vranich, Psy.D., creator of the OXYGEN breathing class at WILLSPACE in NYC. 
But that doesn’t mean your regular ol’ breathing pattern will do. You actually need to think about and control your breath during your workout for peak performance. And when it comes to breathing, one method does not fit all workouts. So check out these expert tips on how to breathe during your favorite workouts: 
During Weight Lifting"Inhale on the less strenuous phase of the exercise, and exhale on the more demanding phase of the exercise," says personal trainer Mike Donavanik, C.S.C.S. If you’re hitting heavy weights, though, Donavanik recommends the Valsalva maneuver: You inhale on the easy part, hold you breath for just a short second as you approach the hardest part of the exercise (commonly called the "sticking point"), and once you’ve completed it, you exhale per usual. The maneuver helps you tighten your core muscles and maintain proper form. However, it does briefly increase blood pressure. So if you have any cardiovascular problems, the move isn’t for you.
During Cardio"Continuous breathing will help you to increase nitric oxide, an important gas that relaxes the arteries and keeps the blood flow that you need to sustain your rhythmic activity," says exercise physiologist Marta Montenegro, C.S.C.S. Instead of breathing in an even pattern, though, try inhaling for three seconds and then exhaling for two, suggests Budd Coates, M.S., author of Running on Air: The Revolutionary Way to Run Better by Breathing Smarter. While it takes some serious concentration at first, research shows that the greatest running impact occurs when your foot strike coincides with the beginning of your exhale. So by keeping a 3:2 breath tempo, you’ll minimize your chance of injury.
During PlyometricsLike we learned with the Valsalva, briefly holding your breath helps stabilize your body, which comes in handy during explosive moves. “Imagine that you are doing a jump to box,” says Montenegro. “Hold your breath when you make contact with the floor so that your body is more rigid, which will help with the rebound.” 
During StretchingStretching is all about loosening up—so focus on inhaling deeply. It relaxes your muscles so you can get a better stretch and lower your risk of pulling anything, says Montenegro. The exhale will follow naturally.

During RecoveryEver finished a set of squats, thought “that wasn’t so bad,” and then started huffing and puffing? That’s because your body needs oxygen to replete its energy stores. So in between sets of exercises, practice diaphragmatic breathing, says Donavanik. Diaphragmatic breathing allows you to get more oxygen into your lungs—and to your muscles—per breath so you can hit your next exercise hard. To do it, focus on filling and emptying your abdomen with each breath rather than raising and lowering your chest. 

the-exercist:

5 Ways to Use Breathing Techniques to get a Better Workout:

"Don’t hold your breath!" It’s something we’ve all heard before while working out…and for good reason. "When you hold you breath, the energy in your cells plunges and you feel fatigued during your workout way before you should," says Belisa Vranich, Psy.D., creator of the OXYGEN breathing class at WILLSPACE in NYC. 

But that doesn’t mean your regular ol’ breathing pattern will do. You actually need to think about and control your breath during your workout for peak performance. And when it comes to breathing, one method does not fit all workouts. So check out these expert tips on how to breathe during your favorite workouts: 

During Weight Lifting
"Inhale on the less strenuous phase of the exercise, and exhale on the more demanding phase of the exercise," says personal trainer Mike Donavanik, C.S.C.S. If you’re hitting heavy weights, though, Donavanik recommends the Valsalva maneuver: You inhale on the easy part, hold you breath for just a short second as you approach the hardest part of the exercise (commonly called the "sticking point"), and once you’ve completed it, you exhale per usual. The maneuver helps you tighten your core muscles and maintain proper form. However, it does briefly increase blood pressure. So if you have any cardiovascular problems, the move isn’t for you.

During Cardio
"Continuous breathing will help you to increase nitric oxide, an important gas that relaxes the arteries and keeps the blood flow that you need to sustain your rhythmic activity," says exercise physiologist Marta Montenegro, C.S.C.S. Instead of breathing in an even pattern, though, try inhaling for three seconds and then exhaling for two, suggests Budd Coates, M.S., author of Running on Air: The Revolutionary Way to Run Better by Breathing Smarter. While it takes some serious concentration at first, research shows that the greatest running impact occurs when your foot strike coincides with the beginning of your exhale. So by keeping a 3:2 breath tempo, you’ll minimize your chance of injury.

During Plyometrics
Like we learned with the Valsalva, briefly holding your breath helps stabilize your body, which comes in handy during explosive moves. “Imagine that you are doing a jump to box,” says Montenegro. “Hold your breath when you make contact with the floor so that your body is more rigid, which will help with the rebound.” 

During Stretching
Stretching is all about loosening up—so focus on inhaling deeply. It relaxes your muscles so you can get a better stretch and lower your risk of pulling anything, says Montenegro. The exhale will follow naturally.

During Recovery
Ever finished a set of squats, thought “that wasn’t so bad,” and then started huffing and puffing? That’s because your body needs oxygen to replete its energy stores. So in between sets of exercises, practice diaphragmatic breathing, says Donavanik. Diaphragmatic breathing allows you to get more oxygen into your lungs—and to your muscles—per breath so you can hit your next exercise hard. To do it, focus on filling and emptying your abdomen with each breath rather than raising and lowering your chest. 

(Source: womenshealthmag.com)

http://the-exercist.tumblr.com/post/83351346144/bitty-kitty-the-exercist-i-genuinely-dont

bitty-kitty:

the-exercist:

I genuinely don’t understand why so much of the fitness community is intent on demonizing medication.

You claim that you want people to be healthy. You claim that you support healthy behaviors. You claim that you encourage people to care for their bodies. If…

the-exercist:

Opposite Limb Extensions


Lay your belly on a ball. Stabilize yourself by placing your hands underneath your shoulders and your feet hip-distance apart.
Simultaneously lift your right arm and your left leg straight out. Hold for two seconds and then release back to the ground.
Now lift your left arm and your right leg. Hold for two seconds and slowly release. Try to move slowly and with control. Try to keep the ball as steady as possible. Use your deep abs to help stabilize. Come back the starting position.
This completes one rep. Repeat this move for a total of 15 to 20 reps, alternating between lifting your left arm and right leg, and then your right arm and left leg.

the-exercist:

Opposite Limb Extensions

  • Lay your belly on a ball. Stabilize yourself by placing your hands underneath your shoulders and your feet hip-distance apart.
  • Simultaneously lift your right arm and your left leg straight out. Hold for two seconds and then release back to the ground.
  • Now lift your left arm and your right leg. Hold for two seconds and slowly release. Try to move slowly and with control. Try to keep the ball as steady as possible. Use your deep abs to help stabilize. Come back the starting position.
  • This completes one rep. Repeat this move for a total of 15 to 20 reps, alternating between lifting your left arm and right leg, and then your right arm and left leg.

(Source: fitsugar.com)

happywithhealthy:

fitnessisfitfor-me:

happywithhealthy:

happywithhealthy:

It’s Easter, you don’t want to eat chocolate or any other sweets because you don’t want to kill your progress/you’re watching your weight/you want to get fit/you’re “fat”. Stop right there. We have a few basics to cover.
1) That photo right there - that’s my families Easter chocolate supply and I currently have a pie in the oven. I’m gonna eat as much chocolate and food, today, as my heart desires. No, I don’t need to and no, maybe I shouldn’t, but I love chocolate. My life’s goal is not to be watching what I eat all the time. **I’m gonna enjoy what I want to enjoy.**
2) Hey Look! This is me: 
You wanna know how I got fit to look like that? By never restricting what I ate. I eat my cravings when i have them, i overindulge and eat too much sometimes but hey, if i’m okay with it you should be too… It’s totally fine to enjoy eating! The key to mental and physical health is never restricting. Don’t scare yourself over something so silly like food. Indulge every once in a while, you won’t freak out next time said indulgence is available **BALANCE AND MODERATION IS KEY. NOT DEPRIVATION!**
3) *One bad day of eating will NOT hamper your progress. Please remember that.*
>I beg of all of you, PLEASE don’t be afraid to binge a little sometimes. We’re only human! Your health has to be in harmony: Mind, Body, Spirit. I absolutely adore food, but I won’t let it get in the way of being fit and vice versa. It’s never a “cheat day” for me. It’s a “I’m gonna let go because I CAN” day. You are all beautiful and amazing, so please, don’t be so hard on your brain. It’s okay to enjoy food. I certainly do!

Bring this back for Easter!

but it’s also ok if you don’t want to go overboard and people need to know that not everyone has a fast metabolism like that, that’s rare, so not many people can eat whatever they want all the time and always give in to their cravings so much, while not gaining fat ^.^ don’t have a false reality everyone!! ~ But yes one day, no matter how much food, will not kill you and your progress. :3

I have a super slow metabolism!!! I don’t eat like that every day haha I did make it sound like that though. I just don’t restrict myself much because I find it becomes unhealthy/obsessive to me (:

happywithhealthy:

fitnessisfitfor-me:

happywithhealthy:

happywithhealthy:

It’s Easter, you don’t want to eat chocolate or any other sweets because you don’t want to kill your progress/you’re watching your weight/you want to get fit/you’re “fat”. Stop right there. We have a few basics to cover.


1) That photo right there - that’s my families Easter chocolate supply and I currently have a pie in the oven. I’m gonna eat as much chocolate and food, today, as my heart desires. No, I don’t need to and no, maybe I shouldn’t, but I love chocolate. My life’s goal is not to be watching what I eat all the time. **I’m gonna enjoy what I want to enjoy.**


2) Hey Look! This is me: 

You wanna know how I got fit to look like that? By never restricting what I ate. I eat my cravings when i have them, i overindulge and eat too much sometimes but hey, if i’m okay with it you should be too… It’s totally fine to enjoy eating! The key to mental and physical health is never restricting. Don’t scare yourself over something so silly like food. Indulge every once in a while, you won’t freak out next time said indulgence is available **BALANCE AND MODERATION IS KEY. NOT DEPRIVATION!**


3) *One bad day of eating will NOT hamper your progress. Please remember that.*


>I beg of all of you, PLEASE don’t be afraid to binge a little sometimes. We’re only human! Your health has to be in harmony: Mind, Body, Spirit. I absolutely adore food, but I won’t let it get in the way of being fit and vice versa. It’s never a “cheat day” for me. It’s a “I’m gonna let go because I CAN” day. You are all beautiful and amazing, so please, don’t be so hard on your brain. It’s okay to enjoy food. I certainly do!

Bring this back for Easter!

but it’s also ok if you don’t want to go overboard and people need to know that not everyone has a fast metabolism like that, that’s rare, so not many people can eat whatever they want all the time and always give in to their cravings so much, while not gaining fat ^.^ don’t have a false reality everyone!! ~
But yes one day, no matter how much food, will not kill you and your progress. :3

I have a super slow metabolism!!! I don’t eat like that every day haha I did make it sound like that though. I just don’t restrict myself much because I find it becomes unhealthy/obsessive to me (:

(via wakeuphealthy)

curvy-mamma asked: I started a new cardio class two weeks ago and the DOMS the next day make so I don't want to move. Are there things I can do to prevent and/or relieve delayed onset muscle soreness?

the-exercist:

DOMS is fairly common whenever we start a new workout routine or increase the intensity of our exercises, but never fear! There’s a lot that you can do to either prevent soreness entirely or help to reduce the amount of discomfort that you end up suffering through:

  1. Always warm up and cool down. Jumping straight into an exercise is going to put unnecessary stress on your muscles and heart, while ending a workout cold turkey doesn’t give you any time to recover. Always ease your body in and out of an intense workout.
  2. Do not static stretch without warming up soon. Although stretching is a great way to ease muscle pain, stretching a cold muscle is just going to cause injury. You’re not helping yourself in this case.
  3. With that said, be sure to consistently stretch and foam roll after workouts (and on rest days). Only work on warm muscles, never push yourself to the point of pain and use dynamic stretches whenever possible.
  4. Make sure that you’re hydrated and eating a balanced diet. Nutritional deficiencies and a lack of water are going to make recovery more difficult, so keep your diet in check. If necessary, especially after strength training, make it a habit to eat some protein in order to aid muscle repair. 
  5. Take a cold shower or ice your muscles. The low temperature will help to decrease muscle inflammation. It may not be the most comfortable thing, but if you tend to get really painful DOMS after certain exercises, then a couple minutes of freezing your butt off might be worthwhile.
  6. If you need to rest, then rest! your body can’t recover if you don’t give it the opportunity to repair itself. There’s no shame in saying that you need to take some time off. Trying to work through pain is not always going to help you, sometimes it can push your body over the edge and cause an injury.

Good luck!

5 Strength Training Truths Every Woman Should Know

whatschic:

I just started working out regularly doing cardio 4 days ago… This is SUCH an achievement since its been a long long time since ive been in a routine.

This article is great since i know nothing about weight training and honestly scared of it because im a female who has always believed in just cardio.

Time for a change people!

(via backonpointe)

the-exercist:

Twisting Row

Lunge forward with left leg, keeping right leg straight, left hand on left thigh, right hand holding a weight with arm at side. Turn torso to right as you pull weight to rib cage (as shown). Return to start.

the-exercist:

Twisting Row

Lunge forward with left leg, keeping right leg straight, left hand on left thigh, right hand holding a weight with arm at side. Turn torso to right as you pull weight to rib cage (as shown). Return to start.

(Source: self.com)

the-exercist:

5 Ways to Use Breathing Techniques to get a Better Workout:

"Don’t hold your breath!" It’s something we’ve all heard before while working out…and for good reason. "When you hold you breath, the energy in your cells plunges and you feel fatigued during your workout way before you should," says Belisa Vranich, Psy.D., creator of the OXYGEN breathing class at WILLSPACE in NYC. 
But that doesn’t mean your regular ol’ breathing pattern will do. You actually need to think about and control your breath during your workout for peak performance. And when it comes to breathing, one method does not fit all workouts. So check out these expert tips on how to breathe during your favorite workouts: 
During Weight Lifting"Inhale on the less strenuous phase of the exercise, and exhale on the more demanding phase of the exercise," says personal trainer Mike Donavanik, C.S.C.S. If you’re hitting heavy weights, though, Donavanik recommends the Valsalva maneuver: You inhale on the easy part, hold you breath for just a short second as you approach the hardest part of the exercise (commonly called the "sticking point"), and once you’ve completed it, you exhale per usual. The maneuver helps you tighten your core muscles and maintain proper form. However, it does briefly increase blood pressure. So if you have any cardiovascular problems, the move isn’t for you.
During Cardio"Continuous breathing will help you to increase nitric oxide, an important gas that relaxes the arteries and keeps the blood flow that you need to sustain your rhythmic activity," says exercise physiologist Marta Montenegro, C.S.C.S. Instead of breathing in an even pattern, though, try inhaling for three seconds and then exhaling for two, suggests Budd Coates, M.S., author of Running on Air: The Revolutionary Way to Run Better by Breathing Smarter. While it takes some serious concentration at first, research shows that the greatest running impact occurs when your foot strike coincides with the beginning of your exhale. So by keeping a 3:2 breath tempo, you’ll minimize your chance of injury.
During PlyometricsLike we learned with the Valsalva, briefly holding your breath helps stabilize your body, which comes in handy during explosive moves. “Imagine that you are doing a jump to box,” says Montenegro. “Hold your breath when you make contact with the floor so that your body is more rigid, which will help with the rebound.” 
During StretchingStretching is all about loosening up—so focus on inhaling deeply. It relaxes your muscles so you can get a better stretch and lower your risk of pulling anything, says Montenegro. The exhale will follow naturally.

During RecoveryEver finished a set of squats, thought “that wasn’t so bad,” and then started huffing and puffing? That’s because your body needs oxygen to replete its energy stores. So in between sets of exercises, practice diaphragmatic breathing, says Donavanik. Diaphragmatic breathing allows you to get more oxygen into your lungs—and to your muscles—per breath so you can hit your next exercise hard. To do it, focus on filling and emptying your abdomen with each breath rather than raising and lowering your chest. 

the-exercist:

5 Ways to Use Breathing Techniques to get a Better Workout:

"Don’t hold your breath!" It’s something we’ve all heard before while working out…and for good reason. "When you hold you breath, the energy in your cells plunges and you feel fatigued during your workout way before you should," says Belisa Vranich, Psy.D., creator of the OXYGEN breathing class at WILLSPACE in NYC. 

But that doesn’t mean your regular ol’ breathing pattern will do. You actually need to think about and control your breath during your workout for peak performance. And when it comes to breathing, one method does not fit all workouts. So check out these expert tips on how to breathe during your favorite workouts: 

During Weight Lifting
"Inhale on the less strenuous phase of the exercise, and exhale on the more demanding phase of the exercise," says personal trainer Mike Donavanik, C.S.C.S. If you’re hitting heavy weights, though, Donavanik recommends the Valsalva maneuver: You inhale on the easy part, hold you breath for just a short second as you approach the hardest part of the exercise (commonly called the "sticking point"), and once you’ve completed it, you exhale per usual. The maneuver helps you tighten your core muscles and maintain proper form. However, it does briefly increase blood pressure. So if you have any cardiovascular problems, the move isn’t for you.

During Cardio
"Continuous breathing will help you to increase nitric oxide, an important gas that relaxes the arteries and keeps the blood flow that you need to sustain your rhythmic activity," says exercise physiologist Marta Montenegro, C.S.C.S. Instead of breathing in an even pattern, though, try inhaling for three seconds and then exhaling for two, suggests Budd Coates, M.S., author of Running on Air: The Revolutionary Way to Run Better by Breathing Smarter. While it takes some serious concentration at first, research shows that the greatest running impact occurs when your foot strike coincides with the beginning of your exhale. So by keeping a 3:2 breath tempo, you’ll minimize your chance of injury.

During Plyometrics
Like we learned with the Valsalva, briefly holding your breath helps stabilize your body, which comes in handy during explosive moves. “Imagine that you are doing a jump to box,” says Montenegro. “Hold your breath when you make contact with the floor so that your body is more rigid, which will help with the rebound.” 

During Stretching
Stretching is all about loosening up—so focus on inhaling deeply. It relaxes your muscles so you can get a better stretch and lower your risk of pulling anything, says Montenegro. The exhale will follow naturally.

During Recovery
Ever finished a set of squats, thought “that wasn’t so bad,” and then started huffing and puffing? That’s because your body needs oxygen to replete its energy stores. So in between sets of exercises, practice diaphragmatic breathing, says Donavanik. Diaphragmatic breathing allows you to get more oxygen into your lungs—and to your muscles—per breath so you can hit your next exercise hard. To do it, focus on filling and emptying your abdomen with each breath rather than raising and lowering your chest. 

(Source: womenshealthmag.com)

http://the-exercist.tumblr.com/post/83351346144/bitty-kitty-the-exercist-i-genuinely-dont

bitty-kitty:

the-exercist:

I genuinely don’t understand why so much of the fitness community is intent on demonizing medication.

You claim that you want people to be healthy. You claim that you support healthy behaviors. You claim that you encourage people to care for their bodies. If…

the-exercist:

Opposite Limb Extensions


Lay your belly on a ball. Stabilize yourself by placing your hands underneath your shoulders and your feet hip-distance apart.
Simultaneously lift your right arm and your left leg straight out. Hold for two seconds and then release back to the ground.
Now lift your left arm and your right leg. Hold for two seconds and slowly release. Try to move slowly and with control. Try to keep the ball as steady as possible. Use your deep abs to help stabilize. Come back the starting position.
This completes one rep. Repeat this move for a total of 15 to 20 reps, alternating between lifting your left arm and right leg, and then your right arm and left leg.

the-exercist:

Opposite Limb Extensions

  • Lay your belly on a ball. Stabilize yourself by placing your hands underneath your shoulders and your feet hip-distance apart.
  • Simultaneously lift your right arm and your left leg straight out. Hold for two seconds and then release back to the ground.
  • Now lift your left arm and your right leg. Hold for two seconds and slowly release. Try to move slowly and with control. Try to keep the ball as steady as possible. Use your deep abs to help stabilize. Come back the starting position.
  • This completes one rep. Repeat this move for a total of 15 to 20 reps, alternating between lifting your left arm and right leg, and then your right arm and left leg.

(Source: fitsugar.com)

(Source: fit-fab-fun, via wakeuphealthy)

happywithhealthy:

fitnessisfitfor-me:

happywithhealthy:

happywithhealthy:

It’s Easter, you don’t want to eat chocolate or any other sweets because you don’t want to kill your progress/you’re watching your weight/you want to get fit/you’re “fat”. Stop right there. We have a few basics to cover.
1) That photo right there - that’s my families Easter chocolate supply and I currently have a pie in the oven. I’m gonna eat as much chocolate and food, today, as my heart desires. No, I don’t need to and no, maybe I shouldn’t, but I love chocolate. My life’s goal is not to be watching what I eat all the time. **I’m gonna enjoy what I want to enjoy.**
2) Hey Look! This is me: 
You wanna know how I got fit to look like that? By never restricting what I ate. I eat my cravings when i have them, i overindulge and eat too much sometimes but hey, if i’m okay with it you should be too… It’s totally fine to enjoy eating! The key to mental and physical health is never restricting. Don’t scare yourself over something so silly like food. Indulge every once in a while, you won’t freak out next time said indulgence is available **BALANCE AND MODERATION IS KEY. NOT DEPRIVATION!**
3) *One bad day of eating will NOT hamper your progress. Please remember that.*
>I beg of all of you, PLEASE don’t be afraid to binge a little sometimes. We’re only human! Your health has to be in harmony: Mind, Body, Spirit. I absolutely adore food, but I won’t let it get in the way of being fit and vice versa. It’s never a “cheat day” for me. It’s a “I’m gonna let go because I CAN” day. You are all beautiful and amazing, so please, don’t be so hard on your brain. It’s okay to enjoy food. I certainly do!

Bring this back for Easter!

but it’s also ok if you don’t want to go overboard and people need to know that not everyone has a fast metabolism like that, that’s rare, so not many people can eat whatever they want all the time and always give in to their cravings so much, while not gaining fat ^.^ don’t have a false reality everyone!! ~ But yes one day, no matter how much food, will not kill you and your progress. :3

I have a super slow metabolism!!! I don’t eat like that every day haha I did make it sound like that though. I just don’t restrict myself much because I find it becomes unhealthy/obsessive to me (:

happywithhealthy:

fitnessisfitfor-me:

happywithhealthy:

happywithhealthy:

It’s Easter, you don’t want to eat chocolate or any other sweets because you don’t want to kill your progress/you’re watching your weight/you want to get fit/you’re “fat”. Stop right there. We have a few basics to cover.


1) That photo right there - that’s my families Easter chocolate supply and I currently have a pie in the oven. I’m gonna eat as much chocolate and food, today, as my heart desires. No, I don’t need to and no, maybe I shouldn’t, but I love chocolate. My life’s goal is not to be watching what I eat all the time. **I’m gonna enjoy what I want to enjoy.**


2) Hey Look! This is me: 

You wanna know how I got fit to look like that? By never restricting what I ate. I eat my cravings when i have them, i overindulge and eat too much sometimes but hey, if i’m okay with it you should be too… It’s totally fine to enjoy eating! The key to mental and physical health is never restricting. Don’t scare yourself over something so silly like food. Indulge every once in a while, you won’t freak out next time said indulgence is available **BALANCE AND MODERATION IS KEY. NOT DEPRIVATION!**


3) *One bad day of eating will NOT hamper your progress. Please remember that.*


>I beg of all of you, PLEASE don’t be afraid to binge a little sometimes. We’re only human! Your health has to be in harmony: Mind, Body, Spirit. I absolutely adore food, but I won’t let it get in the way of being fit and vice versa. It’s never a “cheat day” for me. It’s a “I’m gonna let go because I CAN” day. You are all beautiful and amazing, so please, don’t be so hard on your brain. It’s okay to enjoy food. I certainly do!

Bring this back for Easter!

but it’s also ok if you don’t want to go overboard and people need to know that not everyone has a fast metabolism like that, that’s rare, so not many people can eat whatever they want all the time and always give in to their cravings so much, while not gaining fat ^.^ don’t have a false reality everyone!! ~
But yes one day, no matter how much food, will not kill you and your progress. :3

I have a super slow metabolism!!! I don’t eat like that every day haha I did make it sound like that though. I just don’t restrict myself much because I find it becomes unhealthy/obsessive to me (:

(via wakeuphealthy)

curvy-mamma asked: I started a new cardio class two weeks ago and the DOMS the next day make so I don't want to move. Are there things I can do to prevent and/or relieve delayed onset muscle soreness?

the-exercist:

DOMS is fairly common whenever we start a new workout routine or increase the intensity of our exercises, but never fear! There’s a lot that you can do to either prevent soreness entirely or help to reduce the amount of discomfort that you end up suffering through:

  1. Always warm up and cool down. Jumping straight into an exercise is going to put unnecessary stress on your muscles and heart, while ending a workout cold turkey doesn’t give you any time to recover. Always ease your body in and out of an intense workout.
  2. Do not static stretch without warming up soon. Although stretching is a great way to ease muscle pain, stretching a cold muscle is just going to cause injury. You’re not helping yourself in this case.
  3. With that said, be sure to consistently stretch and foam roll after workouts (and on rest days). Only work on warm muscles, never push yourself to the point of pain and use dynamic stretches whenever possible.
  4. Make sure that you’re hydrated and eating a balanced diet. Nutritional deficiencies and a lack of water are going to make recovery more difficult, so keep your diet in check. If necessary, especially after strength training, make it a habit to eat some protein in order to aid muscle repair. 
  5. Take a cold shower or ice your muscles. The low temperature will help to decrease muscle inflammation. It may not be the most comfortable thing, but if you tend to get really painful DOMS after certain exercises, then a couple minutes of freezing your butt off might be worthwhile.
  6. If you need to rest, then rest! your body can’t recover if you don’t give it the opportunity to repair itself. There’s no shame in saying that you need to take some time off. Trying to work through pain is not always going to help you, sometimes it can push your body over the edge and cause an injury.

Good luck!

5 Strength Training Truths Every Woman Should Know

whatschic:

I just started working out regularly doing cardio 4 days ago… This is SUCH an achievement since its been a long long time since ive been in a routine.

This article is great since i know nothing about weight training and honestly scared of it because im a female who has always believed in just cardio.

Time for a change people!

(via backonpointe)

the-exercist:

Twisting Row

Lunge forward with left leg, keeping right leg straight, left hand on left thigh, right hand holding a weight with arm at side. Turn torso to right as you pull weight to rib cage (as shown). Return to start.

the-exercist:

Twisting Row

Lunge forward with left leg, keeping right leg straight, left hand on left thigh, right hand holding a weight with arm at side. Turn torso to right as you pull weight to rib cage (as shown). Return to start.

(Source: self.com)

About:

My personal fitness and fitness inspiration blog.
This is a sub-blog, so I'm not able to follow back.
No thinspo here.
Here's to losing weight the healthy way!

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